Hardcore for Nerds

"Why sneer at the intellectuals?"*
punk music, left politics, and cultural history - previously found here.
contact: gabbaweeks[at]gmail.com (sorry, no promos/submissions, thanks) or ask
Dublin/Galway, Ireland. 27, history graduate & human rights student
HFN | Best New Punk | HFN 2012 2011 2010 2009 | HRO 2k9 | Hoover Genealogy Project | @HC4N
*from the title of a review of Arthur Koestler's Arrival and Departure by Michael Foot, Evening Standard, Nov. 26, 1943.
Aug 30
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"United Pressing is the largest vinyl pressing plant in the US, with a close relationship to Jack White’s production emporium Third Man Records nearby, as well as Nashville’s booming analogue music recording scene.

Next year the firm will add 16 presses that should boost daily output to 60,000 records. Millar, director of marketing, won’t say where they found the presses – manufacturing of vinyl records ceased in the early 1980s and competition for presses comes from surprising quarters. The last few machines capable of cutting a metal mother – the stamp that imprints the plastic vinyl – were purchased at auction by the Church of Scientology, whose followers believed that the best way to preserve speeches of the master, L Ron Hubbard, for posterity was a 33⅓ album.

[…]

But there’s residual anxiety that the analogue revival is temporary. “Everything comes back once before it goes away for ever,” says VH1’s Bill Flanagan. “If it’s just a nostalgic or hipster-elitest thing, where does that leave us in 10 years? It might be the last gasp of an expiring culture before we all get sucked into the [digital] cloud.”

Nostalgia pays in Nashville as rocketing record sales make it the capital of vinyl

vinyl
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Jul 30
Permalink vinyl economics
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Apr 20
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thesefewpresidents:

fortyshadesofgrey:

lafours:

fortyshadesofgrey:

lafours:

patersonpaterson:

Fuck record store day. Here’s an idea record stores, why don’t you just have cool in-store shows? WOAH. Or here’s an even crazier idea, why don’t you help some local bands release some records? Or actually BUY the records and show a little faith instead of doing consignment. Yeah. Wrap your head…

I never even thought about this stuff until last night when it was pointed out to me that One Direction- a group I have nothing against but are you know, one of the biggest in the world- released a 7” yesterday. Which is cool. However, the demand for it meant that the pressing houses were all full up, so no room for the little guys to have theirs done in time. I totally get the appeal of limited edition items, especially on fancy vinyl. However, the entire point of record store day was to help out the little guys. The record shop and the bands. It’s amazing to see the big deal it’s become over the past few years, but it would be so much more satisfying if it weren’t just going to the big names who don’t need the money.

I saw one direction vinyl yesterday but it was a glam rock band.. Maybe tower ordered the wrong ones.. There were a lot of them.

Yep, that was them. Ironic humour or whatever. Apparently, it not only stopped smaller acts from having theirs done in time for RSD, but even bands who were just planning releases for around this general time. They’d scheduled their album launches for months to be told that they weren’t a priority compared to this lot. Ouch.

What? That’s do fucked up. RSD is meant for smaller independent music people not bloody one direction. Like, I’ve seen people give out about tower records doing RSD, but they are independent in Dublin just cause there store is now bigger than HMV’s. But it’s not for one direction.

Side note: Do one direction fans even own record players or will they try to put them in a cd player? Like most of them are 10 years old.. Right?

I did see the head of RSD UK suggest that it will start to regulate itself to a point. Now, me WOULD be optimistic, but Tower had to buy all those One Direction picture disks. By the time I’d got in they’d already sold out of some thinags I wanted but they had LOADS of One Direction records left. They won’t be making that mistake twice.

There’s still a problem with major labels dominating it in general though. I’m not sure how that could be solved…

I sort of tiptoed around this in my earlier post because I didn’t want to unnecessarily denigrate teenage pop fans (hello, Tumblr poptimists who may be reading this!) but I can’t imagine many One Direction fans own turntables. However, they don’t need to own them, but just have access - which is why I suggested parents or older siblings - a sort of trickle-down effect of the vinyl revival, if you will (although, especially if it’s older siblings, there may be some conflict involved). Furthermore, since there are a lot of One Direction fans, it only takes a few…. and lastly, I think it’s fairly well established that plenty of people will buy a particular record even without the means to play it, *just* because it’s a cool object (which is a large part of why many people buy vinyl, the ability to produce sound from it is merely an extra justification).

As you say, commercial logic dictates that if they don’t sell, they won’t be produced again, at least not in such numbers. But the conspiracy theory would be that there’s some attempt to choke off smaller releases to… I dunno, concentrate the pressing capacity on more lucrative reissues? That’s a stretch, but as you say, the dominance by large players - almost a tautology, really - is a difficult thing to address, as by its nature it’s baked into the capitalist process.

I didn’t partake of RSD this year, in part because I haven’t been buying or even playing much vinyl of late (only having access to a turntable on weekends) and because if I want to buy something, I’d rather do on a quieter day. The only specific release that I heard about that caught my eye was the Life Without Buildings Any Other City reissue, but I’ve decided I still prefer Live at the Annandale Hotel. I went into the new Tower - which really is excellently placed opposite Hodges Figgis bookshop - a couple of weeks ago, and the vinyl section is very nice up on the cast-iron balcony, but… well, I didn’t actually want to buy anything. I was sorry to hear as well that Elastic Witch was closing, although apparently only/mainly because the operator wants to devote more time to playing in his band, but again I only bought a few records there, ones which I could almost as easily have gotten in Tower (with a bit more digging). It’ll be interesting to see if it’s replaced though, because the whole cafe/record store synergetic combination is touted a lot but I wonder if it really stands up, commercially.

After so many years of RSD critiques, I think I’ve become comfortably pessimistic about the whole thing (well, as comfortable as someone not working in a record shop nor with any particular desire to do so). I’m not, and never was, the kind of person that needed or wanted the ‘social’ side of record stores. I’m the guy who walks in and methodically browses through the boxes and picks a couple of things and buys them, with minimal conversation (sorry to any bored shop workers that may disappoint). And I enjoy that, for what it is - it’s qualitatively different from browsing on a computer screen, with the greater element of serendipity and chance, and it’s nice to be able to bring it home and place it on the turntable the same day. Still, those things don’t count enough to me that, frankly, I’d put any real effort into preserving record shops. The people who really dig them, who value the bonhomie and whatnot, I guess they’ll just have to come up with another model.

Maybe the mid-sized independent like Tower will survive, or the odd local shop with a good reputation or good coffee, or maybe there needs to be a more drastic shift towards an essentially non-commercial, community exchange. What really interests me, though, is the stuff discussed here about collective recommendation methods for music streaming online, which is naturally where most of the discussions about music (like this one) have gravitated. Add to that a local element, for artists from a particular geographical area, and online ordering maybe supplemented by, say, stalls at a weekend market, and what do you really need a record store for?

vinyl record store day
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Apr 18
Permalink vinyl punk
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Apr 13
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TFV EMA vinyl vinyl sunday
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Apr 11
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#Selfie

TFV EMA vinyl
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Nov 25
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London Calling through the static hiss

I finally got round listening to the second LP from my newly purchased (second-hand) copy of London Calling and, as I had hoped, it was much cleaner. Obviously whoever owned it before didn’t often play it all the way through, which isn’t too surprising as I know I’m a lot more familiar with the songs in the first half. And when I went back and properly cleaned the first LP (which I really should have done to start with, for the sake of my stylus if nothing else), it did noticeably help.

The thought had occurred to me, however, that record hiss is probably one of the most primary signifiers of vinyl’s physicality - not to over-romanticise it. In fact it’s not something I’ve encountered much or at all, simply because I don’t have that many ‘old’ second-hand records - the only one of similar vintage is a copy of The Undertones, or Patti Smith’s Easter, neither of which seem much overplayed in the way London Calling probably invites naturally. It’s interesting to experience nonetheless, from the strongly audible crackling as soon as the needle hits the record (instead of the normal muted stutter) to the soft fuzz surrounding the opening chords of ‘London Calling’ (which however is quickly overpowered by its booming rhythm) or to hear the quiet beginnings of ‘Jimmy Jazz’ suddenly filled with extraneous noise. It may all be an illusion, but I frequently find that vinyl makes me listen to music with more depth and attention.

vinyl the clash
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Jul 07
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Vinyl Sunday: Sea Tiger, The “Teenage Bandit” LP (Troubleman Unlimited Records, 1998)

Vinyl Sunday: Sea Tiger, The “Teenage Bandit” LP (Troubleman Unlimited Records, 1998)

sea tiger HGP vinyl vinyl photos vinyl sunday
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Jun 27
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paulftompkins:

Twitter: we have fun over there!

actually, since (vinyl) records are an analogue medium you wouldn’t necessarily need electricity to listen to them. some tall trees, rope and coconuts to provide drive power*, a fine reed as the stylus and some dry bark as the speaker cone (I’ve tried the paper cone trick on a regular turntable before, with surprisingly clear results). it would be unamplified and not in stereo, but theoretically you could listen to your records on a desert island, if you were willing to put the work in (and hey, you’re stuck there!).
*I got this idea from Terry Pratchett, who said by way of explanation for the various counterhistorical levels of development in his Discworld fantasy series that the ancient Greeks had the technology to produce a wind-up gramophone, but as far as we know they never did. 

paulftompkins:

Twitter: we have fun over there!

actually, since (vinyl) records are an analogue medium you wouldn’t necessarily need electricity to listen to them. some tall trees, rope and coconuts to provide drive power*, a fine reed as the stylus and some dry bark as the speaker cone (I’ve tried the paper cone trick on a regular turntable before, with surprisingly clear results). it would be unamplified and not in stereo, but theoretically you could listen to your records on a desert island, if you were willing to put the work in (and hey, you’re stuck there!).

*I got this idea from Terry Pratchett, who said by way of explanation for the various counterhistorical levels of development in his Discworld fantasy series that the ancient Greeks had the technology to produce a wind-up gramophone, but as far as we know they never did. 

(via velveteenrabbit)

vinyl
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Jun 23
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favourite Dischord reissue
(okay, the LP is currently out of stock, but that’s not quite the same as limited edition…)

favourite Dischord reissue

(okay, the LP is currently out of stock, but that’s not quite the same as limited edition…)

hoover dischord emo vinyl vinyl sunday post-hardcore 90s
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